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Knit From Your Stash

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Turn your stash into washcloths or potholders using our free Bellish swatch patterns!

There’s no better time than a quarantine (one might even call it a knit-pocalypse), to take a look at your yarn stash with fresh eyes. There are nuggets of potential hiding in your creative space, and we’d like to help you turn them into something productive. 

If you have a bin, basket or bowl filled with leftover yarn, you can use our free swatch patterns to turn them into potholders or washcloths. 

You’ll need a partial ball of worsted weight yarn in a natural wool or wool-blend yarn for a potholder (acrylic yarn is not recommended because the heat will cause it to melt). Or the same quantity in worsted weight cotton, linen, hemp or similar plant fiber blend for a washcloth. (Feel free to adjust the stitch count and needle size if you’d like to use a different weight yarn.)

Note: We recommend using a smaller than usual knitting needle for these projects to create a dense fabric that will create a more durable result (regardless of whether you’re knitting a potholder or a washcloth).

Broken Rib Potholder/Washcloth Instructions 

With US Size 5/3.75mm needles (straight or circular – either are fine) and using our Broken Rib swatch pattern as an example, work your project as follows:

Cast on 41 st using your favorite cast on method.

Knit four rows (garter stitch edge).

Row 1 (RS): Knit 

Row 2 (WS): K2, [K1, p1] rep bet brackets to last 3 st, k3

Repeat these two rows until your project is almost completely square in shape.

Knit four rows. 

Bind off on next row in knit.

Wet block your project and pin flat until dry.

Note: For an extra-thick potholder, knit two pieces the same size. Lay them on top of each other with wrong sides together and stitch around all four sides until they are completely joined. 

Wild Oats Potholder/Washcloth Instructions

With US Size 5/3.75mm needles (straight or circular – either are fine) and using our Wild Oats swatch pattern as an example, work your potholder as follows:

Cast on 43 st using your favorite cast on method.

Knit four rows (garter stitch edge).

Row 1 (RS): K3, [k2, s1wyib, k1] rep between brackets to last 4 st, k4

Row 2 (WS): K3, p1, [p1, sl1wyif, p2] rep between brackets to last 3 st, k3

Row 3 (RS): K3, [1/2 RC, k1] rep between brackets to last 4 st, k4

Row 4 (WS): K3, p to last 3 st, k3

Row 5 (RS): Rep row 1

Row 6 (WS): Rep row 2

Row 7 (RS): K4, [k1,1/2 LC] rep between brackets to last 3 st, k3

Row 8 (WS): Rep row 4


Repeat Rows 1-8 until your piece is nearly square in size.


Knit four rows. Bind off on the next row in knit.


Wet block your project and pin flat until dry.


Abbreviations

k - Knit

p - Purl

RS - Right Side

1/2 LC - Place one stitch on cable needle and hold to front. Knit the next two stitches, then knit the stitch from cable needle

1/2 RC - Place two stitches to cable needle and hold to back. Knit the next stitch, then knit the two stitches from the cable needle

slwyib – slip stitch to right needle as if to purl (without working it) with yarn held to back

slwyif – slip stitch to right needle as if to purl (without working it) with yarn held to front

st - stitch/stitches

WS - Wrong Side

Note: For an extra-thick potholder, knit two pieces the same size. Lay them on top of each other with wrong sides together and stitch around all four sides until they are completely joined.

Yarn skeins and needles in wire basket bellish
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